LXX Reading Plans

Listed below are plans for reading the LXX. The list of plans will grow in time🙂. The verse ranges are keyed to the LXX (Rahlfs unless otherwise indicated), so the reader will need to arrange the MT verses accordingly.

Plan for Isaiah (52 weeks)

8 thoughts on “LXX Reading Plans

      • Thanks for the reply. On a related note: do you know of any reader’s lexicons for the Septuagint (like Kubo for the NT) or any plans for one? I’d love to see either that or a Reader’s Septuagint (like Zondervan’s Reader’s Hebrew Bible). Do you think those would find enough of a market for it to make sense for someone to pursue that?

  1. About Abramkj’s comment, I know a gentleman, a retired rabbi who wrote his dissertation under the direction of Dr. Harry M. Orlinsky, who told me he has been working on such a reader’s lexicon for the LXX. (Indeed, he had even taken a publisher’s advance!) That said, I also know he is not in the best of health … Perhaps I ought to ask him what his plans are for his papers “when he is called home.” I would hate to see his work lost.

    • Phil, thanks for this message… I’d hate to see all that work lost, too… something I’d even be willing to offer to help with in any way that is appropriate. Is this something you would be willing to message me about further offline? You can find my Facebook contact info here: http://abramkj.wordpress.com/about/ and message me through that, if you’re willing….

  2. RE: Abramkj question. The closest to Kubo (but still miles away) is Taylor’s “Analytical Lexicon to the Septuagint”. Mine in the first edition from 1994 with just Greek; but I’ve seen a recent revision that incorperates English glosses from (I believe) Lust’s LXX “Lexicon”. Rahlfs is the base text all around. On the other hand, there is the option of vocab, vocab, vocab. Master the ‘mi’ verbs; learn roots (X. Jacques, 1972; Thomas Rogers, 1981; M. Stehle, 1976). I know, its dog work, but it’s also great fun to read without being tied to a glossary.

    (Thanks for the story about travels to Gottingen.)

  3. Pingback: Reading through the Greek of Isaiah in a year | Words on the Word

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